Show #473 – October 5, 2019

Guests: Ed Benjamin; Tucker Schwinn

Before we get to this week’s show, I wanted to let you know that we will be recording at French Fender Day in Lyme, Connecticut with Peter Weigel and crew next Saturday. We will be attempting to stream some of it live on Facebook – if I can figure it out – and then bring you the interviews in the upcoming weeks.

Watch our social media – Facebook and Twitter – as well as our blog outspokencyclist.com for live feed times if you are interested in seeing it firsthand.

So, let’s get to this week’s show.

Finding ways to ride longer – not only into the season, but into the seasons of your life, might fall under the first topic up for discussion today.

Many years ago, Ed Benjamin hopped on the eBike bandwagon and has never looked back. At the time, there weren’t many people in his corner.

But look at him today… Ed is the Senior Managing Director of eCycleElectric Consultants, a consulting group focused on electric bicycle, scooter, motorcycle, and components for these since 1996 as well as the Chairman of Light Electric Vehicle Association, a trade group for the industry.

Today, Ed joins me to talk about the nuts and bolts of the eBike business – how big it is, who is buying and riding the bikes, and where the future of these vehicles is going.

Then, Tucker Schwinn, yes you know the name, joins me to talk about a sport you may not know even existed, let alone thrives.

As far back as 1942, Bicycle Polo was a thing. Whether today’s bike polo scene is a revival or a brand new chapter in the sport, Tucker, who has been competing since 2004, tells us all about it – how it works, who is participating, and how you can join in on the fun if you want.

Show #469 – September 7, 2019

It’s Our 9th Anniversary Today!

Guests: Chris Carmichael; Gary Mikitin; Tim O’Mara

It is a very special day for me – the 9th anniversary of the Outspoken Cyclist show. Today’s episode is #469 and I am so proud and grateful to have been able to do this work for so long.

In the past week or so, as I’ve shared this anniversary with some folks, I am told that I am a “veteran” of the medium – podcasting – and, in retrospect, I guess that is true.

What is so interesting to me though? It’s how every week there are so many new stories and new people to fill the hour of time. Sometimes, it even feels like work! Yet, for the most part, there isn’t anything I think I would enjoy more than to continue to bring this show to you each week.

So, thank you – for listening, for your comments, and especially for your loyalty and encouragement.

So, let’s talk about show #469 – this week’s episode.

As promised, Chris Carmichael, who is the founder and head coach at CTS – Carmichael Training Systems, is with me to talk about regaining your confidence after a crash. While much of the conversation pertains to riding with others in a group, there are some noteworthy tips for all of us about skills and handling – whether riding alone or racing in a peloton.

Then, we have our man-on-the-ground Gary Mikitin with us to talk about an announcement made just Thursday by the Department of the Interior about eBikes in the National Parks. You will recognize Gary’s voice as that of the person who opens and closes the show each week.

[Photo of Asst. Secy., of the Interior Rob Wallace by Gary Mikitin]

The Dept of the Interior chose our CVNP as the venue to make the announcement and Gary was there.

Finally, we head south to Atlanta to speak with Tim O’Mara. Tim and his wife Becky bought a fixer-upper on the west side of Atlanta a few years back. But, as fate would have it, a young neighborhood girl knocked on their door soon after they moved in asking for some help. And, the story takes off from there.

Today, Tim and Becky run Bearings Bike Shop – a non-profit organization that gives kids the life skills they will need to be successful – at whatever they choose.

Show #447 – April 6, 2019

Guests: Joe Lindsey; Larry Pizzi, Happy Freedman

Three guests – three topics.

First, it’s a controversy! Everyone loves a good he said – she said; only in this case it’s WaveCel vs. MIPS helmet technology.

On March, 19th Matt Phillips published the following headline in Bicycling Magazine “Bontrager Says Its New Helmets Can Prevent Concussions 99 out of 100 times.”

And, it didn’t take long for those who developed the MIPS technology to refute Bontrager’s claims, citing an inability to replicate the testing.

Reading the article reminds me so much of just how the bike industry makes its claims – one company reports its sales in dollars while another reports in units. And, the same is true in this article. Case in point?
The article states: The company says that a helmet with Wavecel will prevent a concussion 99 out of 100 times. A standard foam helmet, for comparison, can only prevent a concussion 42 percent of the time. See what I mean?

So… rather than trying to sort it out myself, I turned to freelance journalist Joe Lindsey. Joe breaks down the controversy and puts some thoughtful ideas into what you might do if your head DOES hit the ground in his April 2nd article for Outside Online titled: Trek’s WaveCel Helmet Technology Is Causing Controversy”

Joe ALWAYS does his homework and that is true in this case. He’s my first guest.

Then, we head out to L.A. to speak with Larry Pizzi, the president of Accell North America. The last time we spoke with him back in 2013, he was with iZIP, an electric bike brand; and today, while iZip is STILL a brand in the stable, Larry oversees several other eBike brands.

Today, we talk about how eBikes are faring in the world of cycling – their growth, who is riding them, and how regulations around the use of eBikes is being developed and implemented.

Finally, it’s a discussion with one of the #1 bike fitters in the country, if not on the planet. Soft spoken and serious, Happy Freedman has decades of experience coupled with the use of the Leon Root, MD Motion Analysis Lab a state-of-the-art testing facility at the Hospital for Special Surgery in NY City.

Yet, with all the fancy-schmancy equipment at his disposal, Happy has a straightforward and relatively simple way of making the adjustments needed – and they aren’t what you