Show #571 – September 4, 2021

Guests: Jenn Hamelman; Michael Rogers

This week, we explore the USBRS – AKA, the U.S. Bicycle Route System with ACA‘s Jenn Hamelman.

Jen has “touched” every mile of the maps that ACA offers – she was a cartographer for the organization for almost 20 years.

Now, she is tasked with coordinating the US bicycle route system and just this past month, 2,903 new miles were added in 5 states.

We talk about how new routes are added and signed, and what the ultimate goal is for the USBRS.

PS – O-H-I-O… Not only were more miles added to the USBRS in Ohio, but we rank #1 in the sheer number of miles ON the USBRS system. Something for which we can be very proud.

andersbrinckmeyer.com

Then, we speak with ex-pro racer Michael Rogers.

Michael, who comes from a cycling family, turned pro in 2000.

He won the world TT title three times, competed in many grand tours as well as one-day classics, has quite a few stage wins under his helmet, and is now the innovation manager for the UCI.

During his 16 years in pro cycling, he saw a lot of changes in the sport. From the influence of the Italians he watched the impact of a more scientific application when the English started improving the riders’ helmets, apparel, and more.

Now, he sees a third transition as all the marginal gains have been achieved and a whole new generation of cyclists are training and racing with high technology from power meters to 3-D printed handlebars.

Michael’s job as innovation manager is a new role at the UCI – dealing with technical innovations, safety, and a whole lot more.

Show #567 – August 7, 2021

Guest: Vince Jourdain

This week, we welcome one great guest to the show – someone who has a wide and deep knowledge of the UCI AND the peloton.

As you know, there was a lot of controversy in this year’s Tour de France about all the incidents – beginning with day one’s crash from a spectator leaning into the peloton and taking out the lead rider, causing the domino effect.

And, outside the race, there have been numerous discussions among professional fitters about what else might be causing so many riders to crash – from the size of the bikes and the kind of equipment the riders are using to the levels of skill and a lack of respect that newer riders on the world tour are bringing to the competition.

So, I decided to go to the source, and today, my guest is Vincent Jourdain.

Vince was in charge of Race Operations for the UCI from 2016 until earlier this year; and was National Coach for Canada for 15 years.

His duties were far reaching – from the organization of each event to fielding actionable complaints and incidents during an event.

Today, with everyone having a video camera in his or her pocket, and the wide reach of social media, every race can be fraught with issues that might need adjudicating. It’s a BIG job.

What happens when there’s a crash or a motor vehicle gets in the way? What is the process and who decides what is to be done?

Are riders coming to the world stage too early or without going through the proving grounds of local, state, national, and eventually world tour steps?

And, then of course there is the equipment – what happens when something breaks or there is an equipment failure and how does the UCI determine what is acceptable?

And, does the industry place too much pressure on the UCI to accept certain products or product categories?

These are all questions I put to Vince and, I think you will not only enjoy this conversation, but learn a lot about how professional racing is done!.

Show #550 – April 10, 2021

Guests: Tim Jackson; Max Pratt

This week’s show started out a lot differently from the way it has ended up.

We do have a fabulous conversation with Max Pratt, a young and very talented frame designer/builder from Providence, RI. And, I think you’ll find his perspective about frame building and the other projects he supports refreshing and somewhat unusual.

By chance, I was looking at the list of exhibitors from the N.E. Builder’s Ball from 2020. Of course, the event had to be postponed due to the pandemic, but I decided to check into a few of the builders who were new to me and saw Pratt Frameworks.

Of course, I clicked on the link and really liked what I saw. Of course the bikes are lovely, but it’s the other things that Max Pratt, who calls himself a frame designer rather than a frame builder, is not only saying but what he is doing that made it so compelling.

And, there was another very interesting and pertinent topic I was ready to offer up and went ahead with a great conversation about that too. It’s all about climate and carbon emissions and what business and industry is doing along those fronts.

But, I’ve bumped that piece until next week, and here’s why.

Much more urgent news has made headlines – specifically Arkansas and the laws that are and will continue to affect transgender athletes as well as young people who are, as Molly Cameron put in her piece in Bicycling Magazine this week, ” navigating identity and just trying to be themselves in a state that clearly does not care about them.”

To discuss all the ramifications of what is happening in Arkansas, especially as it pertains to the UCI and USAC, the World Championship CX races, and the threats of boycotts, we talk with Tim Jackson whose editorial in Bicycle Retailer, The Industry Has An Arkansas Problem, tried to make the case for pulling the USAC and UCI World CX Championships out of Fayetteville in 2022.

We know that the Walton Family and the Visit Bentonville, Arkansas organizations have invested heavily in making Arkansas a welcoming place for bicycling with a deep and honest commitment to mountain biking.

But, in the wake of new laws targeting the LBGTQ+ community and especially transgender youth, Visit Bentonville’s president Kalene Griffith was only willing to offer a one-line comment about the controversy of the new laws stating: “”We’re committed to inclusive trail and visitor experiences in our city and welcome everyone to Visit Bentonville.”

The Walton Foundation’s Tom Walton, issued a written statement on April 6th that begins: “We are alarmed by the string of policy targeting LGBTQ people in Arkansas. This trend is harmful and sends the wrong message to those willing to invest in or visit our state.

But, do the Walton Foundation and the Chambers of Commerce have any clout that might move the legislature toward rescinding these draconian laws?
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shoe #437 – January 26, 2019

Guests: Steve Frothingham; Sean Petty

Frigid air, ice and snow, and thoughts begin to wander towards spring and getting off the trainer and back outdoors.

So, I thought I would give you a little history this week with an extended conversation with Sean Petty.

Beginning in 1985 when Sean joined the Southland Corporation (think Team Seven Eleven) and became part of that era of great American competitive cycling with the likes of Greg LeMond, Davis Phinney, and Andy Hampsten and up until today where he still serves on the boards of USA Cycling and the UCI, he maintains a remarkable and unique perspective about our sport.

We start our conversation way back at the beginning of his career and bring it right up to the present day where his obvious love of the sport will see the first all-women’s UCI pro race here in the States this summer.

Before we get to Sean’s interview though, I thought it was important to bring Steve FrothinghamBicycle Retailer & Industry News‘ editor on to talk about how the government shutdown is affecting the bicycle industry and perhaps you.

The CPSC – consumer products safety commission – is running on a skeleton crew and there are two bicycle recalls that have not been issued because of the shutdown. Steve will tell us about those recalls and what else might be happening with the lack of government oversight

Show #355 – July 8, 2017

Guests: Dan Wuori; Brent Schroetenboer; Bob Mionske; Gernot Sauter

Should Peter Sagan, the reigning world champion, have been summarily ejected from the Tour de France after Stage 4? Controversy surround the “hasty” decision by the officials and it’s too late! Sagan was on a plane home the same night.

Velo News columnist Dan Wuori joins me to talk about the incident. He also reminds us that “Tour de Pharmacy” airs on HBO tonight, July 8th, at 10pm eastern

Then, USA Today journalist Brent Schroetenboer, wh has been following the Lance Armstrong case, gives us some background on the latest iteration of the saga as the November trial date looms ahead. Do the Feds have enough to convict Armstrong on the charges they are bringing or will we see an end to the controversy?

After Nako Nakatsuka was hit from behind by a car, she received a “pay up” letter from the driver’s insurance. She was suddenly liable for “backing in to the car and causing damage”. What ensued was evidently a comedy of errors adding insult to her injuries and the damage to her bike. Bike lawyer Bob Mionske and I discuss this case, what to do when you are involved in a crash, and how to prevent future litigation.

Finally, we hear from our National Bike Challenge Stories riders with our second audio. Gernot Sauter lives in Dusseldorf, Germany and as an employee of NBC sponsor 3M, gives us his impressions of the Tour de France, which started practically outside his doorstep.

Show #176 – January 4, 2013

Guests: RBR’s Jim Langley and the newly appointed UCI Tech Commission’s Dimitris Katsanis

 
 
If you can tear yourself away from thoughts of the frigid apocalypse about to descend on the northeast United States, we’ve got a great show for you this week. And if you’re listening from somewhere else in the world, try not to gloat as you kick back on the porch in your shorts and sandals.

First up is Jim Langley, bicycle mechanic, cycling author and former Bicycling Magazine tech editor. Jim has a long history with the bicycle, much of which is chronicled here and here. Most recently, he achieved the nearly unbelievable milestone of having ridden his bike for 7,300 consecutive days. That’s 20 years’ worth of daily riding! Jim is also the technical editor for SmartEtailing, a service to help local bike shops maximize their online presence.

In the second half of the show, along with news from the world of cycling, Diane talks with Dimitris Katsanis, the engineer who designed Team Great Britain’s current crop of track bikes. The big news is that Katsanis has been named as a consultant to the UCI’s Equipment Commission. The UCI has been much-maligned for its perceived stifling of technical innovation. Will this appointment signal a change in the governing body’s approach to equipment? Listen in and find out.

Show #105 – September 1, 2012

Guests: Charles Pelkey, Keith Laughlin

Charles Pelkey is an attorney, cyclist, and regular contributor to Red Kite Prayer. With more articles about Lance Armstrong, the USADA, the UCI, and doping accusations, it seems almost impossible to sort it all out.  Charles puts it all in perspective and more.

Keith Laughlin is the President of Rails to Trails and lives in Washington, DC.  Keith is also one of the best informed cycling professionals I know.  He is keenly aware of what is happening in Congress and around the country as it pertains to cycling advocacy.  In this election year, Keith helps us understand what is at stake and what you can do to make syre that bicycles are not shoved under the rug.