July 9, 2020 – Special Edition

Guest: Rachael Maney From Bike Law

For as long as I can remember, the bicycle industry has been on a “mission” to get more women on bikes – whether that means recreationally, for transportation, for leisure riding, or for elite competition.

The truth is, that there are already millions of women on bicycles – both worldwide and right here in the U.S. And yet, we seem invisible.

At this moment in time, a time where nothing seems to fit – where there are so few things we feel we can depend upon and trust anymore – there is the simple and well known fact that bicycles and women go together – perfectly.

To illustrate this more fully, my friend, colleague, and an elite bicycle rider herself, Rachael Maney, and I offer up this conversation.

It was recorded July 3rd.

We welcome feedback and comments.

Show #507 – June 13, 2020

Guests: Rachael Maney; Sgt Mike Wear

This week’s show tries to put some perspective on the events of not only the past two weeks; but, also the raw realities that have emerged about everything we might have been taught when we were in school and what we think we see in the news and on the streets today – and how the bicycle can be a symbol for both good and bad.

As we try to untangle and understand all the myriad things that are happening – – from COVID19 and its profound effects on our lives and the economy, to the horrific and sickening death of George Floyd and the subsequent global outcries for equity and justice, I turned to my friends and supporters at Bike Law for some perspectives that you may not have heard yet.

Peter Wilborn, who is the founder of Bike Law, started out as a civil rights attorney. In fact, in 2016, Peter wrote a piece for the Bike Law Blog titled, Biking is a Civil Right.

National Bike Law Director, Rachael Maney, has some very personal connections to discrimination and civil rights herself.

So today, Rachael and I take a look at everything from statistics and consequences to illustrations of how inequities show up in everyday situations.

Then, I speak with Sgt Mike Wear, the VP and Public Information Officer for IPMBA. the International Police Mountain Bike Association (IPMBA) is a non-profit association dedicated to promoting the use of bikes for public safety, providing resources and networking opportunities, and offering the best, most complete training for public safety cyclists.

Over the past couple of weeks as people demonstrated, and sometimes rioted and looted, you may have seen photos of police officers holding their mountain bikes up as shields – or what some headlines have said as weapons – to fend off crowds of people.

From those photos came a barrage of commentary from bike manufacturers that they would no longer supply bicycles to police departments and will “do better” and be “all in” in making changes in their work cultures.

Then I got to thinking and started seeing another side – a way different side – of police on bikes and decided there was way more to the story than the knee jerk reaction – including mine – of condemning the police for the work they were trying to do.

Show #500 – April 18, 2020

It’s our 500th show! NO KIDDING!!!!
And, it’s a special edition of the show!

We turn the microphone around while Brian interviews Diane.

We discuss a variety of topics from how The Outspoken Cyclist started to what we want to see going forward.

Thanks for listening to the show.

Thanks for being a member of our “team.”

I hope you will continue to enjoy our weekly episodes.

Show #480 – November 30, 2019

Guests: Rachael Maney; Eben Weiss aka Bike Snob NYC

 

When long distance triathlete Rachael Maney was hit by a car, she found her Bike Law teammate a valued asset in not only helping her with her case; but, also as a trusted friend who helped get her back out on the bike.

Now, Rachael is the National Director for the 26-state network of Bike Law attorneys. She wears a lot of hats in her multiple roles that cover the gamut from advocacy and outreach to public relations and marketing.

We also head to the Big Apple where I catch up with one of the most recognized “voices” in the bicycle world – BikeSnobNYC’s Eben Weiss.

As one of the earliest bloggers on the subject of cycling, Eben’s rapier wit is now heard on the air waves with his weekly call-in show on WBAI 99.5FM in NYC.

He still blogs daily as well as writes regular columns for the NYC Alt-Trans advocacy organization as well as OutsideOnLine

Show #388 – February 17, 2018

Guests: Peter Wilborn; Mary Wisnewski; encore interview with Rody Walter

RADIOTHON 2018!!! Yep – it’s time to log on to wjcu.org and pledge your support for the show AND the station. We only do this once a year and all of the money raised goes directly to the station! Any amount is greatly appreciated – and, thanks for listening!

Over the past year, we have reported on cyclists who have been hit – often fatally – while riding. We haven’t however, talked much about cyclists who crash by virtue of obstacles in their paths – obstacles like potholes or sewer grates or raised barriers that are difficult if not impossible to see.

Cyclists have been badly injured – sometimes sustaining permanent disabilities – and their equipment has been damaged.
Now that the roads are beginning to show the ravages of winter, I thought it would be a good time to talk about what you can and probably should do if you encounter these types of issues.

My first guest is Bike Law’s Peter Wilborn. Peter knows all too well about cyclists who are injured and equipment that is damaged as he has devoted his legal career to their causes. We walk about what to do if you encounter a road hazard, what needs to change when it comes to being less vulnerable on the road, and ends with a plea to “keep on riding”.

After a break, Chicago Tribune transportation reporter Mary Wisnewski talks to me about the work she has been doing in her town to shed some light on the disparity among residents who are being ticketed to minor cycling infractions. Her 2017 article “Biking While Black: Chicago Minority Areas See The Most Bike Tickets” was followed up this week with her column Black neighborhoods still see most bike tickets, police data show.

Mary and I talk about what the statistics show and how, while the number of tickets is decreasing, the disparity is staying the same.

Finally, since this is NAHBS weekend – and, unfortunately, circumstances did NOT pan out for me to attend the show, I thought I’d bring back one of my favorite people in an encore interview. Rody Walter from Groovy Cycles in Wooster, Ohio has been my guest a couple of times and was also a member of my frame builder’s panel in Sacramento.

He has a smart and unique view of the custom bike world and I thought hearing this conversation again would whet your appetite for some fancy bikes.

#nahbstweets will be goin on all weekend and beyond to showcase some of the beautiful equipment being exhibited in Connecticut.